“Imitation Game” is no imposter

By Tess Barnett, staff writer

In history class, we normally only learn about the events that changed the course of wars or nations. The life of those who commit these great acts and discoveries is rarely taught to students.

One such man is Alan Turing, who invented the machine that helped to win World War II for the allies. “The Imitation Game” is the story of this incredible man’s life.

My knowledge about Alan Turing before seeing the movie was slightly above average, and I was pleased to see that the writers and directors of the film had maintained a high degree of historical accuracy in portraying the work of Turing during World War II.

Alan Turing, a genius mathematician from Cambridge, was played by Benedict Cumberbatch, who also stars in the wildly popular “Sherlock” television series. In both roles, Cumberbatch is required to play a socially inept genius who solves other people’s problems for the fun of it.

The movie follows Turing’s adventures while working as head of a team in England whose job is to break the unbreakable enigma that will hopefully bring about the end of the war.

Turing is accompanied in his computer building by an oddity in the 1940s world of electronics: Joan Clarke, a woman who surpasses his puzzle-solving skills and is played by Kiera Knightley.

To me, the message of the film was the injustice that Turing faced after the end of the war. The audience witnesses his downward spiral after he is made into a criminal for being gay. Seeing a war hero ostracized for his sexual preferences revealed the naivete of ages gone by.

“The Imitation Game” is one of the best movies I have seen in my life. The actors, particularly Cumberbatch, portray their characters expertly and successfully tell the story of the amazing and brilliant Alan Turing.

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