NFL draft

Story by: Connor Curts, staff writer

Every year, just a few months after the Super Bowl, 256 young men, fresh out of college, are selected by a team in the National Football League Draft. Over the span of three days, 256 dreams come true, and hundreds of others are crushed.

The picks are spread out over a total of seven rounds, with the first two containing 32 picks each. The remaining five rounds each vary in their amounts of picks.

“With the first pick, in the 2015 NFL Draft, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers select, Jameis Winston, a quarterback from Florida State University,” said Roger Goodell, the NFL Commissioner.

These were the words that fans all over the world had been waiting to hear for several months. Winston was predicted by many experts to be the first overall pick, and by the day of the first round, it was nearly a guarantee. It is not uncommon for reports of which players each team is going to select to be leaked out prior to the start of the draft, and that held true this year.

Among the notable draftees this year was Marcus Mariota, a Tennessee Titans draftee and a former Heisman Award winner. The Heisman Award is the most prestigious award given out in college football, and it was the first time ever that two Heisman winners were taken with the first and second overall picks in the draft.

The hometown Indianapolis Colts drafted wide receiver Phillip Dorsett from the University of Miami, a pick disputed by many fans. The Colts already have a deep core of receivers and tight ends, so the pick will only deepen Andrew Luck’s weapons arsenal.

“I really don’t understand what the team is doing here. We already have the offensive weapons we need. What we really needed was a safety,” said Luke Duckworth, 10.

For all who went undrafted, the days after the draft annually bring opportunities to sign with a team as an “Undrafted Free Agent,” with a chance to still keep their dreams alive. Though many don’t make it, it’s a chance to be a diamond in the rough, and prove their worth.

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