Fuller House

Story by: Claire Dorsch, Features Editor

The house down the street just got fuller, ladies and gentleman, because the American sitcom “Full House” is back with a twist.

DJ Tanner-Fuller was, at the end of the original series, only 18 and graduating high school. In the revival, she is a 40 year-old widow and mother of three. Her kids become too much to handle on her own, so she invites her sister Stephanie and best friend Kimmy to live with her, just as her father had done in the original series.

The setting has not changed and the tall white and grey house with the red door is shown in the trailer, which shows the famous Golden Gate Bridge and the green lawn across the street from her house. The audience gets to see the kitchen and the living room with so much detail that was not in the original series. A puppy is scratching at a door when it hears the voices of the old cast, even one of Joey Gladstone’s catchphrases, “Cut. It. Out.”

Most of the original cast will be shown in all 13 episodes of the Netflix series, except for Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen, which means no Michelle Tanner.

Nevertheless, the cast will be coming back better and ever with John Stamos, who played Uncle Jesse, as an executive producer.

There is much promise with the new series, which will be released on Netflix on February 26, which is just around the bend. Don’t forget to catch it when it released and see just how much fuller this house has become.

“Imitation Game” is no imposter

By Tess Barnett, staff writer

In history class, we normally only learn about the events that changed the course of wars or nations. The life of those who commit these great acts and discoveries is rarely taught to students.

One such man is Alan Turing, who invented the machine that helped to win World War II for the allies. “The Imitation Game” is the story of this incredible man’s life.

My knowledge about Alan Turing before seeing the movie was slightly above average, and I was pleased to see that the writers and directors of the film had maintained a high degree of historical accuracy in portraying the work of Turing during World War II.

Alan Turing, a genius mathematician from Cambridge, was played by Benedict Cumberbatch, who also stars in the wildly popular “Sherlock” television series. In both roles, Cumberbatch is required to play a socially inept genius who solves other people’s problems for the fun of it.

The movie follows Turing’s adventures while working as head of a team in England whose job is to break the unbreakable enigma that will hopefully bring about the end of the war.

Turing is accompanied in his computer building by an oddity in the 1940s world of electronics: Joan Clarke, a woman who surpasses his puzzle-solving skills and is played by Kiera Knightley.

To me, the message of the film was the injustice that Turing faced after the end of the war. The audience witnesses his downward spiral after he is made into a criminal for being gay. Seeing a war hero ostracized for his sexual preferences revealed the naivete of ages gone by.

“The Imitation Game” is one of the best movies I have seen in my life. The actors, particularly Cumberbatch, portray their characters expertly and successfully tell the story of the amazing and brilliant Alan Turing.

Going “Into the Woods”

By Ian Carson, Managing Editor
Photo by Halee Evans

into the woodsPerhaps one of the best stage-to-film musicals I have seen yet, “Into the Woods” was no disappointment. With a cast that worked very well together, along with sheer talent, they put on a musical like none other.

Stage-to-film musicals are hard to accomplish in the first place, but when they are done well, they can really stand out. I would not go so far as to compare this to the film production of “Les Misérables,” which will always hold a special place in my heart, but it is definitely up there rank-wise.

The first thing that struck me about the movie was how talented the actors and actresses were. The acting was on par by all those involved. Lilla Crawford, who played Little Red, did an astounding job of singing. Her voice was always powerful and radiant, which is not exactly what one would expect from a child actress.

I must also give credit to Stephen Sondheim, who composed the music in the film. The orchestra always did a spectacular job of backing up the vocal parts; the music itself contained many melodic motifs throughout the musical.

The acting by all the parts was astounding. Meryl Streep, who played the Witch, did an wonderful job of showing the different sides of her character. Her portrayal was spot-on, and I could really see the depth of her character in her performance.

She was not the only one who stood out, however. James Corden as the Baker did a great job playing his character. I really felt like Corden became his character, and had no trouble at all playing his part.

Although mostly serious, the film did have its entertaining moments.

“My favorite song was ‘Agony’ because it really showed how the movie could have comical moments as well as serious ones,” said Katelyn Schuck, 11.

The set design and camera work was beautiful. Dion Bebe, who managed cinematography, did celestial work on her part of the film. The camera angles were always perfect, and she always knew just what sections to shoot. The set was as vibrant as ever, with a realistic and mysterious forest, along with a cute yet small village. This was a section of the film definitely worth mentioning.

The stage-to-film production of “Into the Woods” was a joy to see, although it deviated from the original musical in some instances. For example, this version contained a happier ending than the musical. I could not find anything wrong with this wonderful adaptation. I would give it 4 out of 5 stars.