#TEAMCAP

Story by: Maggie Brown, News and Copy Editor

When going into the theater to see “Captain America: Civil War,” my expectations were extremely high. I am an enormous fan of the Marvel movies, and as someone whose favorite has always been Captain America, I was pretty sure that no matter what happened I would be on Team Cap.

Thankfully, as I witnessed the events of the movie I found that even if Steve Rogers hadn’t been my personal hero, I would have been Team Cap. The movie was excellent, and is the perfect blend of action and comedy, as all Marvel movies seem to be. The addition of characters such as Spiderman, who is portrayed by Tom Holland, and Ant Man, who is played by Paul Rudd, add so much to the already fantastic story line. The quality of almost all of the performances was beyond my expectations, and I am extremely pleased.

The story was a bit odd, but the themes were clear and the point they were attempting to make was definitely made. What makes a hero? Does killing a few to save millions warrant revoking a hero’s title? Would it even make someone a monster?

In my opinion the lives of a few are worth less than the lives of all. Sacrificing a building of people, or even a city of them, to save the world is entirely justified. Team Cap is the only way to go here.

 

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Deadpool is not the average hero

Story by: Maggie Brown, News/Copy Editor

“Deadpool,” based on the popular comic books, is a movie that has been much anticipated by people from all walks of life. “Deadpool” is rated R, unlike most Marvel movies, and the reason is quite apparent. The “F-bomb” is dropped 84 times, which is 83 more times than is acceptable in movies with PG-13 ratings. The fight scenes are much more graphic than anything I’ve ever seen in a superhero movie, although the term superhero applies quite loosely to Deadpool.

Wade Wilson is a man who, when diagnosed with cancer, seeks a cure in a “mutant factory,” a place where a man named Francis attempts to force people to mutate with some sort of serum and around the clock torture. The treatment works, but causes Wilson to become what is described by his friend Weasel as looking like “an avocado that had sex with an older avocado,” which is to say quite ugly. He then spends almost two years trying to track down the man named Francis in hopes of curing his ugliness.

As a fan of Marvel, I was extremely pleased with the way this movie came out. From an openly pansexual protagonist to the well-executed fight scenes and quick humor, “Deadpool” is an all around hit. Ryan Reynolds was perfectly cast, and the way he portrayed Deadpool was excellent. His comedic timing was impeccable, his character more than adequately developed, and his physical appearance is arguably one of the better ones to ever appear in Hollywood films.

I thoroughly enjoyed “Deadpool”, and after a few more times viewing and examining it, it may even make my top three favorite superhero movies, which is quite an honor indeed. I highly recommend “Deadpool” to anyone with a strong stomach, a tolerance for language, and a sense of humor that toes the fine line between genius and crass.