Lifeline app will give you a lifeline to fun

Story by: Claire Dorsch, Features Editor
Photo by: Claire Dorsch, Features Editor

Lifeline

When I first heard of this game, Lifeline, I thought of the movie “The Martian” with Matt Damon stuck on Mars. I was very wrong.

The game starts out with an astronaut messaging you from the wreckage of their spaceship, the Varia, and in need of help. Let me just say that I was a goner by this point, there is no not finishing this game. This gender-nonspecific, sarcastic, and lovingly sassy character tries to find a way to survive on this moon near Tau Ceti. Whenever Cadet Taylor asks you a question, the game gives you two options to choose from, which makes you think a lot about your decisions, because remember, Taylor can die because of your choices.

This incredible game was the reason for my first panic attack, and for people near the end of the game, they know the reason for it. During the whole game, I was hooked to the story. It’s entirely told from Taylor’s point of view, which can get annoying, especially when I think of the hours they have left me alone with the “[Taylor is busy]” message on the screen and the many times they have passed out or lost signal with their last words being”OH MY GOD,” which is a lot.

I love that Taylor doesn’t use pronouns, so Taylor could be blonde white dude with really bad decision-making skills or an Asian-American women with long blue hair. The character’s physical appearance is totally up to the player. Thank you Dave Justus. You are a fantastic writer for doing that.

The game also goes by real time, so if Taylor says they are eating breakfast, Taylor will literally take a half hour to be done eating, and Taylor sleeping will surely take hours.

I recommend this app to people who are not faint of heart or have free time to spare, because this game had me sneaking my phone out in the middle of class to see what Taylor was up to at that point in time, and I can’t wait to purchase the sequel game “Silent Night.”

I became very attached to Taylor during this game. I felt personally responsible for Taylor’s life, which kinda sucked because I killed them the first day I started playing.

Please, play this game. It will make you cry and want to fling yourself off a cliff. But in a good way.

Sneaky apps

By Claire Dorsch, staff writer
Photo by Hallee Evans, staff photographer

apps photoApps are everywhere. They are on phones, tablets, and computers. They are beneficial objects to have. Some can download music. There are game apps and social media apps. Some apps are free and some apps cost a ton of money. There are some really cool perks from having apps, but there are consequences.

It is common knowledge that apps need to have access to certain aspects of phones. Apps like Skype or free-texting apps have access to people’s contacts, just like photo-editing apps have access to people’s photos.

But some apps have been peeking into places they don’t belong. Nike has access to people’s contacts.

Facebook asks for access to people’s audio and camera.

These seemingly harmless apps can access things on people’s phones, tablets, and laptops.

“That is amazing if apps could actually do that,” said Mary Barnett, 9. “The quality of the moral of the situation really depends on what side you’re on, whether you are the hacker or the victim.”

A few months ago there was a commotion about the app series called “Talking Tom & Friends.” Users speculated that the app was a front for pedophiles to track people’s phones who had the app.

According to USA Today, it was confirmed to be a false alarm and the app was taken off the app store, but the scare got people thinking. It is unknown what else these hackers can do to put our society’s children at risk.

Apps are great. They make life easier. People can pay bills and transfer money on banking apps like American Express. People can give kudos or give recognition to their friends and family on CyberProps.

“ I really like this app. It is a cool way to compliment people on a job well done without the awkwardness of face-to-face conversation,” said Makaela King, 9.

Hundreds and thousands of apps are just a few taps of a finger away, but maybe in the future people can think twice before they sign away their privacy.